Family Literacy
The summer months are the ideal time to encourage family and friends to invest in their future by taking the time to read. Family literacy, also known as intergenerational literacy, is defined as adults and children learning together. Family literacy programs are driven by holding parents and caregivers responsible for providing the educational foundation for the continued success and growth of our nation while addressing the literacy strengths and needs of the family and community. According to the National Center for Family Literacy, parent-child literacy activity, such as reading to children, improves children's language skills and heightens their interest in books. Also, the more frequently a parent reads to his/her children, the more likely the children are to show emerging literacy skills.

Take advantage of the summer months by taking a trip to the library, visiting a bookstore, or searching the Internet for a literacy activity to share with your children. By scheduling at least 20 minutes in your day to read, you can establish a pattern showing the importance of reading to those that you mentor, guide, or supervise. Reading together also builds confidence for low-literacy adults who might be reluctant to read in front of other adults and provides a positive display of literacy to children.

To learn more about family literacy, the GovBenefits.gov website is highlighting some of the benefit programs available to obtain further information.

Head Start and Early Head Start
The Head Start program (for children ages 3-5) and Early Head Start program (for pregnant women, infants and toddlers) promote school readiness for children in low-income families by providing comprehensive educational, health, nutritional, and social services. For more information, visit the Head Start and Early Head Start Program.

Even Start: Migrant Education
The Even Start Migrant Education Program improves the educational opportunities of migrant families through family literacy programs that integrate early childhood education, adult literacy or adult basic education, and parenting education. For more information, visit the Even Start: Migrant Education Program.

National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), Library of Congress administers a free national library program of Braille and recorded materials for blind and physically handicapped persons who are unable to read or use standard print materials. For more information, visit the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

Youth Education and Training Activities
The Youth Activities Program provides grants to State and local communities to operate a comprehensive array of youth services that help low-income youth (ages 14-21) seeking assistance in achieving academic and employment success. For more information, visit the Youth Education and Training Activities Program.